United States Inspectors Certificate to Pilots. 8 ¼” x 10”. Certification to Silas Elkins for pilot of steam vessels  for the Big Sandy River and its tributaries. Good graphic of a broadside of a sidewheeler. Original fold lines, exhibits some soiling and wear, overall VG+.
The 1838 law proved inadequate as steamboat disasters increased in volume and severity. The 1847 to 1852 era was marked by an unusual series of disasters primarily caused by boiler explosions, however many were also caused by fires and collisions. These disasters resulted in the passage of the Steamboat Act of May 30, 1852 in which enforcement powers were placed under the Department of the Treasury rather than the Department of Justice as with the Act of 1838. Under this law, the organization and form of a federal maritime inspection service began to emerge. Nine supervisory inspectors responsible for a specific geographic region were appointed. There were also provisions for the appointment of local inspectors by a commission consisting of the local District Collector of Customs, the Supervisory Inspector, and the District Judge. The important features of this law were the requirement for hydrostatic testing of boilers, and the requirement for a boiler steam safety valve. This law further required that both pilots and engineers be licensed by the local inspectors. Even though time and further insight proved the Steamboat Act inadequate, it must be given credit for starting legislation in the right perspective. Probably the most serious shortcoming was the exemption of freightboats, ferries, tugboats and towboats, which continued to operate under the superficial inspection requirements of the law of 1838. Again, disasters and high loss of life prompted congressional action through the passage of the Act of February 28, 1871.

TRANSPORTATION – MARITIME - RIVERBOAT LICENSE TO PILOTS – 1875

SKU: trma803
$195.00Price

A Glimpse of Americana

PO Box 2401 
Litchfield Park, AZ 85340-2401
info@aglimpse.com